Tag Archives: genre

Like Father, Like Son – A Short Story (Horror)

I was challenged to write a horror story a month ago, about the things that sadden, disgust, and disturb me.

I don’t write horror. It may sound silly, but I hold to the belief that what we think about makes up who we are. I don’t want to ponder the things that break my heart, make me cringe, or fill me with fear and sadness. (Go ahead, you’re free to mutter, “Pollyanna.” The time is apt.)

But, I also don’t cower in the face of challenge. And to be honest, I’ve been struggling with weaving enough feeling and emotion in my prose. I rationalized that if I could make my own skin prickle with creepiness, induce my sorrow by speaking of wrongs (which ought to be righted), I would achieve my aim of stirring the feelings of my reader. I have a tendency to intellectualize, and focus on action. I want to feel more while I write and horror accomplished the task. Believe me, it  made me sad. It kept me awake at night. But I did it, and you can too.

The very first literary magazine I sent it to published it today. (Meanwhile, the stories I consider my darlings receive rejections, go figure.) I used a pen name–I do that when I publish anything I won’t allow my children to read (such as a romantic scene or profanity in dialog).  Please let me know what you think, bad or good.

Picture courtesy Wordhaus.com

Picture courtesy Wordhaus.com

Here is my horror story, Like Father, Like Son, published at Wordhaus.com

Have you ever written outside your regular genre? What was it like? What did you learn? Please comment below.

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Sprout fought for life even at the cost of his brother—but is it enough? A wordhaus horror—Click to tweet

In this wordhaus horror, the odds don’t look good for the bastard child of a man who’s killed his own progeny before—Click to tweet

**Note: the medical aspects in my story are factual. Even this: Unborn Babies Feel Anger and Joy, Life News (2014.)

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Filed under For the love of writing, Short stories, Your highest potential

Act One: 10 Essential Elements

I’m a little addicted to the The Script Lab. As I worry over and scrutinize my fiction novel, tweets about screen-writing from @TheScriptLab interject with lucid, helpful, applicable ideas. My blog is for creatives of all stripes, and ideas for good writing can come from any genre. I really like this list of elements; it reminds me of both my responsibility to me reader and also makes a handy checklist to ensure all the key pieces are visible and organized before pitching a potential agent with my first chapter.

Let’s see what we can learn about the ten essential elements of Act One today from the informative folks over at The Script Lab:

The first act is very simply: the beginning of your story.
Usually the story begins at the moment when the first character faces the difficulty that he or she has to solve, and it better be a clear difficulty, and he better realize that he must do something. Dramatic form means action, and action brings tension. So the awareness of the tension, and the clarification of what the nature of your tension is, helps to build the whole manuscript.
ACT ONE: ESSENTIAL ELEMENTS
Tone.  Very quickly you want to establish the tone: is it serious, a comedy, a fantasy, a spoof? Let people know right away that it is okay to laugh, to cry, to dream, etc.
Theme. You will also want to establish the theme – what message are you trying to convey: “Don’t judge a book by it’s cover”, “The underdog triumphs”, “Good versus evil”, etc.
World of the story. As the story begins, you will introduce the world of the story – where does it take place? What is different and interesting to this world? What are the rules of this place?
Character introductions. At the same time, you will introduce the principle characters to the audience. Be specific and original. Let us know their age, how they dress, walk, talk. Give them a scene in which they stand out from the others. Let the audience know these people are special.
Protagonist weakness. The main character’s weakness(s) must be clear so that the later obstacles can attack that weakness in the second act.
Point of attack. The point of attack (or inciting incident) is the moment when the dramatic conflict announces itself. It’s the first perception of the predicament to come, and usually, a moment that is very visual.
Main tension. This predicament sets up the main tension around which the story will be built: Will they fall in love? Will they rob the bank? Will they escape alive? Will they do all three?
The stakes. The stakes have to be clear in order to show the audience how and why this tension is important to them, or – more importantly – what will happen if the character does not solve his/her problem. It should be huge – a matter of life and death.
Objective. A character’s objective or goal is what drives him. This should be very specific, very clear. How badly does he/she want something and what are the lengths he/she is willing to go to get it.
Lock-in. The first act concludes once the main character is locked into the predicament, propelling him/her forward on a new quest trying to accomplish a specific goal. Now the reader/audience knows the character, the predicament, and the objective, so everything else is about the future.

Usually the story really begins at the moment when the first character faces the difficulty that he or she has to solve, and it better be a clear difficulty, and he better realize that he must do something. Dramatic form means action, and action brings tension. So the awareness of the tension, and the clarification of what the nature of your tension is, helps to build the whole script.

Follow me on Twitter @RebeccaLacko

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Filed under Best Writer Tips, Fiction Novel Writing, For the love of writing, Guest posts